Kati Haycock

Center for American Progress Kati Haycock

Cynthia Brown, Arne Duncan, Kati Haycock, and Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
Image: Ralph Alswang / Center for American Progress

Kati Haycock is a California girl who took Washington, D.C. by storm. Born and raised on the west coast, Haycock decided to stay local and spent her undergrad and graduate tenures in the University of California system (UC Santa Barbara and UC Berkley respectively). Her passion for education took her from student to educator, as she is now Director and Founder of Education Trust, an organization looking to close the opportunity and achievement gap between underprivileged students and their well-off counterparts. Haycock’s goal is to see improvement and success in all students, from pre-school through college.

Center for American Progress Kati Haycock

Kati Haycock
Image: Center for American Progress / Ralph Alswang

Haycock’s journey to Education Trust started with her alma mater, where she was the director of outreach and student affirmative action for nine University of California campuses. Her passion for finding educational success among our nation’s underprivileged youth helped her found The Achievement Council, a California-based organization helping teachers and principals at predominately minority schools improve their students’ educational achievements. From there she served as executive vice president of the Children’s Defense Fund, the nation’s largest child advocacy organization.

Haycock has become a leader and a voice for education, speaking to thousands of educators, policy makers and business leaders each year about strengthening academia for poorer students. She’s a published author and award winner and she also serves as director on many education boards, including the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, The New Teacher Project and the Hunt Institute.

Haycock’s work with Education Trust has led her to the role of one of the most respected women in education. She continues to fight for minorities and the poor, believing that the power of education will help all children find success.

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